IJLLL 2015 Vol.1(3): 193-198 ISSN: 2382-6282
DOI: 10.18178/IJLLL.2015.1.3.37

Second Language Acquisition in Arab Learners: A Paradigm Shift

Mohammed Ilyas Ebrahim and Naeem Afzal
Abstract—The Arab world has witnessed a very positive and drastic change in the use of English language both in business and education. This change is significant in many ways including a society more inclined to literacy, as well as a keenness to learn and command the English language. However, in universities and other higher educational institutions a peculiar feature of the Arab EFL learners is that they cannot understand the oral as well as written English language even when articulated normally. It has also been observed that still a few of them “prefer” the use of L1 i.e., Arabic, in acquiring the English language (L2) for diverse reasons including not fully skilled and trained in this language or often lacking motivation to communicate in L2. This research study contextualizes and analyses the issues usually raised in Second Language Acquisition in the Arab learners’ situation. The paper also briefly refers to the critical debate over recognizing what is being called as Arabicized English. This paper also refers to a few theoretical and ideological perspectives drawn from Krashen’s Input hypothesis theory and Chomsky’s linguistics theory which is based on the belief that language learning is a result of a continuum that happens between the “internal reality” of language in the individual’s mind and the “external reality” of language in society.

Index Terms—Arab learners, EFL classrooms, first language (L1), second Language (L2).

The authors are with Department of English, Prince Sattam Abdul Aziz University, Saudi Arabia (e-mail: m.ebrahim@psau.edu.sa, n.awan@psau.edu.sa).

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Cite:Mohammed Ilyas Ebrahim and Naeem Afzal, "Second Language Acquisition in Arab Learners: A Paradigm Shift," International Journal of Languages, Literature and Linguistics vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 193-198, 2015.

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