IJLLL 2016 Vol.2(3): 123-126 ISSN: 2382-6282
DOI: 10.18178/IJLLL.2016.2.3.80

How to Recognize a Literary Fugue When You See One? Literature in the Context of Intermediality

Joanna Barska
Abstract—The history of reflecting on relations between literature and music is not only a history of searching for artistic manifestations of such a relationship, but also, or perhaps primarily, the history of a search for finding a way to adequately comment on them, a search for a methodological formula. Musico-literary studies, situated in a vaguely defined “in-between” space, are, as Harold Bloom would put it, anxiety-stimulating. This fear stems from our overwhelming need to systematize, to hierarchize, and to establish relations. It is difficult to define what kind of work we describe as “musicalized” fiction, i.e. a unique musico-literary hybrid, which we strongly desire to find regions of stability in, to define the subject of our studies, and to find more tools for verification.

Index Terms—Literary fugue, comparative literature, interart studies, music and literature.

Joanna Barska is with University of Warsaw, Poland (e-mail: j.barska@yahoo.fr).

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Cite:Joanna Barska, "How to Recognize a Literary Fugue When You See One? Literature in the Context of Intermediality," International Journal of Languages, Literature and Linguistics vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 123-126, 2016.

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