IJLLL 2019 Vol.5(4): 210-214 ISSN: 2382-6282
DOI: 10.18178/IJLLL.2019.5.4.229

Ethics in Performance of Violence: On Controversy of Collen Murphy‟s Pig Girl

Changli Li
Abstract—Canadian playwright Colleen Murphy’s Pig Girl, prize-winning works of 2016 Governor General's Award and 2014 Carol Bolt Award, is based on a real criminal case and the increasing number of murdered and missing Native Canadian women. The play not only reveals a fact that women from indigenous communities in Canada are at high risk of violence, but also exposes the indifference of police force and the whole government. Despite the sympathy toward the deadly fate of aboriginal women, especially from a white playwright, the play still arouses strong objections and boycott from the Native communities. This contrasting reaction towards the play should merit due attention. This paper, with a comparison with other artistic works dealing with similar violent theme created by First Nations artists, tends to identify the difference and take some hints for future works. Only in this way, can a piece of work dealing with violence, especially violence suffered by generations of marginalized groups, contribute to the implementation of justice without getting involved in ethical argument, and eventually become an indispensable agency of intervention of social violence and curing of the historical trauma.

Index Terms—Aboriginal women, colonial violence, ethics of representation, Pig girl.

Changli Li is with School of Management & Communication, Capital University of Physical Education & Sports, and with School of Foreign Studies, University of Science and Technology Beijing, China (e-mail: lichangli01@126.com).

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Cite:Changli Li, "Ethics in Performance of Violence: On Controversy of Collen Murphy‟s Pig Girl," International Journal of Languages, Literature and Linguistics vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 210-214, 2019.

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